Vilakazi Street, Soweto – The day after the announcement of Nelson Mandela’s death

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People pour onto Vilakazi Street in Orlando West, Soweto. On the street is former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home. Many marched and sung struggle songs in honour of Mandela, who died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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Thembeni Tau sits outside former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. The Soweto resident is here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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A boy stands for a photograph outside former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. The boy is here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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A family writes a message of condolence on a poster outside former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. The family are here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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Chandre Jardine (20) from Meledale, Johannesburg writes a message of condolence to former South African president Nelson Mandela outside his former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. She is here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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Philippa Da Costa and her son Oliver and daughter Isabel look at flowers and messages left outside former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. The family is here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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People sing and dance outside former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. Residents are here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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Business is solid outside former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. People turned out to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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People head towards former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. Residents are here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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People sing and dance outside former South African president Nelson Mandela’s former home in Vilakazi Street, Soweto. Residents are here to mourn Mandela’s death and celebrate his life. Mandela died on the evening of the 5th of December. Picture: CORNELL TUKIRI 06/12/2013 ©

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36 responses to “Vilakazi Street, Soweto – The day after the announcement of Nelson Mandela’s death

  1. What a blessing Nelson Mandela was to us all. Though our paths have never crossed, his words has touched my heart and life. For that, I thank you Sir.

      • Hello, I am really new to this blog page. Could you answer a question or two for me? How do I find people? How do I find tags (#), and how do I become more involved in blogs? Thank you.

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  2. The singing and dancing that I have seen on the television over the past few days has had a profound effect on me. The celebrations of the people of South Africa, more than any floral tribute or written eulogy, has illustrated the depth of love and respect they have for Nelson Mandela. Mandela was a gift to the world and his life, hard as it was, should be celebrated by all of us.

  3. Should we need a reminder of the power of one, let us look no further than Nelson Mandela. From poverty to prison to president. Thank you, Mr. Mandela.

  4. Great human being. A benchmark for all the political leaders in this world to emulate. The world has lost a statesman. The world needs many more Mandela’s to finally achieve peace and real democracy. May his soul rest in peace.

  5. Its pictures like this that need to be shown to the world. Even though we bid goodbye to him , it allows us a chance to unify. Even in death , he still preaches his message. This post makes me so proud to be a South African.

  6. I hope his legacy grows stronger and that a greater awareness is created. Each of us can begin by reaching out to the people that need us the most and never allow injustices to happen during our watch. The lesson need to start in the home and extend into the classrooms of the world. We are all teachers in some form. We can do it.

  7. Pingback: Freshly Riffed 60: I Think We’ve Made The Wrong Decision | A VERY STRANGE PLACE·

  8. I love seeing all races and cultures, young and old, mourning and yet celebrating this man. As Melba Christie stated, we can each extend Mandela’s legacy by reaching out. I hope that other leaders of the world learn from it.

  9. It’s an incredible thing to see people of all races and religions, all colours and creeds, coming together to mourn a man who fought so hard for equality. In her religious ed class yesterday, my daughter’s teacher likened Mandela to a modern day prophet, I think that’s a fitting description.

  10. Nelson Mandela was a registered terrorist in the USA until 1996 when he was finally taken off the list. He is also responsible for the terrorist killings of hundreds of people. Not spreading hate, just reminding people to take the blinders off.

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